CHR back in place with a shuffle around

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The new PSU has worked so far so it was back up into the attic rack for my R210ii. No other modifications although if it manages a couple of weeks I will most likely look into some Noctua fans to quiet it off a bit. A bit of a tidy up as well removing some old switches and getting the patch panel in line.
One of the next jobs on the list will be to get a “CRS3XX” down into the cave so I can take advantage of some 10GB goodness with failover on 2 of the 3 fibres.

A breathe of life for the CHR

There has been a glimmer of hope for the CHR. I’ve come across a donor R210 with a power supply that is in brilliant condition, installed the power supply and it burst back into life. A good hour getting ESXi re-installed to the SSD I’d wiped and then reloading a CHR image onto it then carefully copying over the config and it’s just about ready to bring back into service.

I’ll be sorry to part ways again with the Hex and the FastTrack setup but this time around with the CHR I’ll be going for a really big QoS tree build.

CHR – Now faster and more efficient!

I’ve finally had some time to pull drag a monitor up into the attic to make some changes to the ESXi server that hosts my CHR. After some extensive reading on the MikroTik forum, it looks to read that a virtual CHR benefits from a “real” core and not a virtual one, in some cases virtual cores hindering performance! Even though my residential 55/15 connection isn’t going to set the world alight, I want to do some really in depth packet inspection next year so having raw performance is top of my list.

The changes I’ve made were to move the server BIOS performance setting from “OS Control” which was initially set to try and minimise noise in the cave to maximum performance, a few packets made there maybe?

The second big change was to turn off the hyperthreading on my Xeon. When I bought the Xeon I went out of my way to buy one with 4c/8t for maximum cores but RouterOS itself is very single core based and can’t multi-thread so single core efficiency is key. It also benefits from L3 cache so splitting the cache between 4 rather than 8 helps more so. There is also some heat efficiency to be made by running the processor without HT which counter balances the BIOS performance setting which could increase heat.

Overall testing without firewall now yields a far healthier 10+Gbps speedtesting to itself on a single core compared to the previous 7(ish).

All will be undone though if/when rOS7 launches with multicore!

Bank Holiday PC Build For Dad

Little bit of a show off post. Dad had seen a HP Pavillion All-In-One on PC world website and spoke to me about getting an updated PC, I told him not to be silly and I can build significantly better for similar money. So I did. The Pavillion was built on older Gen hardware with a 27″ screen, 7700T i7 CPU, 16GB RAM and a 2TB HDD. That was the benchmark to beat so ended up with the following build;

i5 8600, MSI GTX1050Ti Graphics card, 16GB DDR4 3200Mhz RAM, 500GB SSD boot drive, 2TB HDD for data storage, Seasonic 550W Gold rated PSU, Corsair Carbide 275R case and a Dell P2717H monitor. I ordered up a new keyboard and mouse from Asus as well just because it’s nice to have a new everything.

Pics of the build are below, it was a dream to put together.